Meryl Streep

 

Meryl Streep + Woody Allen in ManhattanNicolas Cage + Meryl Streep in AdaptationMeryl Streep + Ed Harris in The hours

Biography

Meryl Streep

Meryl Streep
There are some days when even I think I'm overrated, but not today

Remarkable:

- Mamma Mia! -
The story of a bride-to-be trying to find her real father told using hit songs by the popular '70s group ABBA.

Born:

June 22, 1949

Born as:

Mary Louise Streep

Born in Summit, New Jersey (USA), Meryl's early performing ambitions leaned toward the opera. She started voice training at age 12 and took up acting in high school.

Streep made her Broadway debut in 1975 with Trelawny of the Wells and her screen debut in Julia (1977).

In 1978 she took the female lead in The Deer Hunter, picking up her first Academy Award nomination. That same year she also starred in the television miniseries Holocaust.

One year later Kramer vs. Kramer (1979) established her as a first-rank star. Streep's career continued to climb in the 1980s.

In the 1990s her fame declined a little. In spite of forays into comedy (Death becomes her (1992)), Streep was always considered a serious actress, her name typically associated with a serious, often depressing sort of film. In 1994 she tackled her first action film, The river wild and in 1995 she was back with The Bridges of Madison County (Directed by Clint Eastwood).

Meryl's reputation as an acting great remained, appearing in Marvin's Room , and completing another successful decade with Music of the Heart.

Selected Movies:

Academy awards:

2003 Nominated Best Actress for: Adaptation. (2002)
2000 Nominated Best Actress for: Music of the Heart (1999)
1999 Nominated Best Actress for: One True Thing (1998)
1996 Nominated Best Actress for: The Bridges of Madison County (1995)
1991 Nominated Best Actress for: Postcards from the Edge (1990)
1989 Nominated Best Actress for: A Cry in the Dark (1988)
1988 Nominated Best Actress for: Ironweed (1987)
1986 Nominated Best Actress for: Out of Africa (1985)
1984 Nominated Best Actress for: Silkwood (1983)
1983 Won Best Actress for: Sophie's Choice (1982)
1982 Nominated Best Actress for: The French Lieutenant's Woman (1981)
1980 Won Oscar Best Actress for: Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)
1979 Nominated Best Actress for: The Deer Hunter (1978)

 

Meryl Streep + Robert de Niro in The deer hunter

Rumours and new films

- A Question of Mercy -
An adaptation of the novel by David Rabe

- Dirty Tricks -
The wife of Richard Nixon’s chief of staff (Streep) comes to her husband’s defense in the aftermath of Watergate.

- Wanted -
A female policewoman (Jennifer Aniston) in Texas is framed for narcotics trafficking and sent to prison. Her cellmate is a war protester (Streep) who’s renounced violence, and the two plot an escape.

- Doubt -
A nun (Streep) confronts a priest (Philip Seymour Hoffman) after suspecting him abusing a black student. He denies the charges.

- First man -
The story of a Ted Turner-like mogul, (Robert De Niro), who puts his career on hold to run a presidential campaign for his wife (Streep).

News

This week 22 years ago Death becomes her premiered (July 31, 1992)

This week 8 years ago The Ant Bully premiered (July 28, 2006)

Trivia

Meryl came in second in a poll of the world’s worst fictional bosses. Her portrayal of New York fashion editor Miranda Priestly, in The Devil Wears Prada (2006) ended just after Scrooge. Source / More (Web)

Meryl has a star on Hollywood Boulevard.
It’s located between Orange Drive and La Brea Avenue.

Early in her career, Streep received a letter from actress Bette Davis. Davis told Streep that she felt that she was her successor as the premier American actress.

Meryl learned to play the violin for her role in Music of the Heart (1999). She practiced 6 hours a day for 8 weeks.

With 13 Academy Award nominations (10 for Best Actress and 3 for Best Supporting Actress) she’s the most nominated actor ever.

Meryl Streep was Katharine Hepburn’s least favorite modern actress. Source / More (Book)

Meryl has her handprints set in cement on Hollywood Boulevard (Hollywood, USA, in the forecourt of Grauman’s Chinese Theater). Source / More (Web)

Bibliography